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Freelancer.com – a Marketplace for Spammers

November 29, 2011

Cleaning up the spam comments from my blog always raises a bit of a chuckle, thanks to the poorly-worded “compliments” I get for my posts. It’s also bloody annoying. Here are a couple of examples from today:

Ahaa, its fastidious conversation about this piece of writing at this place at this weblog, I have read all that, so now me also commenting at this place. (from https://explorecomms.com.au/2011/11/16/acma-australian-smes-using-internet-%e2%80%93-but-not-social-media-%e2%80%93-for-business/)

Can I just say what a reduction to seek out somebody who actually knows what theyre talking about on the internet. You positively know how you can bring an issue to gentle and make it important. Extra individuals must learn this and understand this side of the story. I cant consider youre not more popular since you definitely have the gift. (from https://explorecomms.com.au/2011/11/17/nothing-like-australia-well-nothing/)

I’ve often wondered what goes on behind the scenes and who is involved in producing this spam – and a project notification I received today from Freelancer.com gave me some insight:

Manual Commenting Project

I’m looking for someone to do manual blog commenting on URLs I provide to them.

I’m paying $0.05 per approved comment (so the link must be live). I will regularly provide new links for you to comment on.

Make the comments relevant to get them approved.

For a $30 project -> 600 approved comments.

(See http://www.freelancer.com.au/projects/Internet-Marketing-SEO/Manual-Commenting-Project.html)

Given that I wrote some pretty disparaging things about Freelancer.com a few weeks ago, my opinion is only hardened when I see first hand on my own blog what could be the results of a Freelancer.com “project”.

“While Freelancer.com may have been established with the best intentions, in my field of expertise, all that it is succeeding in doing is filling the Internet with dross, encouraging plagiarism, manipulating social media and allowing unscrupulous operators to source services cheaply and easily to further their dodgy agendas.”

Since that last post, I have persevered with Freelancer.com – paring back my areas of skill to reduce the amount of dross I get in my inbox, and trying to limit my email notifications to once a day (note to Freelancer.com – I’ve had even more emails since I tried to do this).

I’m now going one step further and deleting my account. I’m not prepared to support a site that provides a marketplace for spammers.

(Pictured: “20080621 Spam 01”, PP Martin, available under Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) licence.)

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