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More local recognition and support needed?

October 26, 2018

In terms of recognising Australian technical innovation, we tend to focus our attention on the eastern seaboard, so it’s great to have the opportunity to highlight a significant piece of industry achievement from South Australia.

You probably hadn’t heard the news, but a collaboration software product from SA was presented with an Engineering Emmy this week in Hollywood: cineSync, developed by Adelaide firm Cospective.

You can read more about cineSync  and the Emmy win on fxguide.

eng-2018-cospective-p-900x600

Rory McGregor, CEO of Cospective, from left, Neil Wilson, Robert Bartlett, and Roland Empson accept the Engineering Emmy Award for Cospective at the 2018 Engineering Emmy Awards (Phil McCarten/Invision/AP Images) – https://www.emmys.com/photo/484806?galleryid=484771

 

One of the creators of the software was recently recognised locally for his achievements – with Tony Clark from Rising Sun Pictures (RSP) presented with the 2018 SA Pearcey Entrepreneur Award last month in Adelaide. Tony is pictured below, receiving his award from Professor Mike Miller.

Professor Mike Miller and Tony ClarkAccepting his award, Tony was pretty outspoken about the lack of technology industry and government support and recognition for homegrown innovation in his speech:

“At a really fundamental level we need to support our entrepreneurs and insist that our government helps to build local businesses that are here because they love and are committed to this place, not because they are coming for subsidies.”

Tony‘s career achievements to date have been remarkable.

First up, RSP established its own high-speed broadband network in 2004 called “Cinenet” that’s since become part of Superloop (https://www.superloop.com/cinenet/) which helped RSP to win the contract for the special effects on Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (see an old ABC news story on this here: http://www.abc.net.au/technology/articles/2011/09/13/3316672.htm).

Then, it was during the production of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire that RSP first developed the cineSync software  so that people could easily collaborate on the film across different locations (https://cospective.com/cinesync/). cineSync has since become the default industry tool around the world and won the creators a technical Oscar back in 2011 (some news on that at the time here: https://www.smh.com.au/technology/aussie-geeks-win-big-at-oscars-20110214-1at5e.html). It has also led to a web-based version of the software called Frankie, all achieved out of the company’s Adelaide base.

The list of movies that RSP has worked on are incredible – it’s worth checking out their demo reel on their home page – https://rsp.com.au/home/. And cineSync is now pretty much in use by every major production studio, to the point that it “has become almost a new verb, replacing ‘review session’ in much the same way ‘Googling’ something has replaced ‘searching’.” (https://www.provideocoalition.com/frankie-makes-content-sharing-and-client-review-simple-and-easy/)

Maybe we need a little more local recognition and support for technical achievements like this?

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