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App overload?

April 17, 2019

comms appsAs a consultant working with a range of different technology companies, it’s a matter of course that you have to become familiar with a bunch of different communications applications, because everyone has their own set of collaboration tools that they use. The picture left gives you an idea of the number of comms apps I’m using on a day-to-day basis.

While it’s unavoidable for consultants like Explore Communications, for employees in a large corporation collaboration should be a lot simpler. However, a RingCentral survey last year found that workers use an average of four communications apps at work, and almost seven out of 10 waste up to an hour of work daily simply navigating between them.

Of course, it shouldn’t be like that, but there are any number of reasons as to why organisations are yet to consolidate onto a common unified communications (UC) platform. That said, even if every organisation did manage to consolidate, they are not all going to be using the same UC vendor! That still makes inter-organisational collaboration a challenge.

VidyoRemember that feeling of panic as you wait for five minutes for the conferencing application to download and install on your PC before you can join the meeting? I still haven’t gotten around to uninstalling the Vidyo app that fires up every time I reboot my PC – an app I had to download for a couple of meetings I had two years ago, but haven’t needed since.

The good news is that things seem to have got a lot easier. Now, most of the conferencing providers I use have developed a mobile app that by and large works beautifully. Click on the link from your calendar invitation, the app launches and generally automatically connects you to the meeting by voice, video, chat and screen sharing. And if you don’t have the app yet, it’s a pretty quick and simple process to install it. Sure, if you are on a smart phone, it’s not a great screen to view a shared PowerPoint deck, but in most cases it does the job perfectly. And you can still use the PC version of the application if you need the larger screen.

Features, functions and performance are obviously important, but ultimately it’s the UC vendors that focus on the end user experience that will be successful in the long run.

 

 

 

 

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